Honor Native Land

Honor Native Land

By Trisha Moquino
5-minute read

Land acknowledgements need to happen because only then will we begin to provide a more truthful and just learning about Indigenous people of this land; our languages, our histories, our existence, our children. Indigenous people, according to the the ReclaimingNativeTruth.org project found that the number one problem Indigenous people of today face is INVISIBILITY and ERASURE which compounds many of the problems our people face which includes many people culturally appropriating from us, minimizing us, tokenizing us, and devaluing our humanity. So then when we share issues facing our people, they are not considered important and or pressing issues (i.e. our Sovereignty, sacred sites, language revitalization, healthcare, mascots, the education of our children, the Indian Child Welfare Act, our traditional governance systems, and beyond). Land acknowledgements are a crucial step toward the United States practicing truth and reconciliation. The power and potential of doing land acknowledgements in our classrooms and other public spaces every day is a gateway to providing a more truthful and honest education to all of our children.

Where Are You Really From?

Where Are You Really From?

By Anri Wheeler
8-minute read

What does it look like to have conversations about race that acknowledge and center the fact that the U.S. was built on a foundation of genocide, antiblackness, and white supremacy, and find ways to validate and incorporate the experiences of those of us who occupy the many spaces between the categories around which we have oriented our research, our vocabulary, our world? These are the questions I am working to answer for myself -- a biracial educator, who is often perceived to be white and has a white partner -- and as a mother to three strong, biracial girls.

Tearing Out My Deeply Rooted Defects

Tearing Out My Deeply Rooted Defects

By Katie Kitchens
3-minute read

Searching for what it means to be a white person doing the work of racial justice is an ongoing (and lifelong) journey for me:

  • To become a better ancestor (thank you, Leesa Renee Hall)

  • To reclaim my own humanity

  • To really show up for the People of the Global Majority that I love because I don't think you can love someone and passively (or actively) participate in their oppression

  • To work in solidarity for universal liberation.

This poem was birthed from that searching. 

Speaking For Ourselves

Speaking For Ourselves

This call for submissions is for original essays, poetry, prose, creative nonfiction, and visual art. The authors will retain the copyrights of their work. We accept work in all languages. We do not accept previously published works, including social media, personal blogs, or any other news sources. Please pay attention to our guidelines before submitting. Submit by March 1, 2019!


Reimagining Schools as Spaces for Radical Healing

Reimagining Schools as Spaces for Radical Healing

By Carly Riley
6-minute read

“By understanding the causes, effects, and restorative responses to toxic and traumatic stress, we adults have not only the ability but the obligation to buffer its long-term impact on the children in our lives. To truly reimagine our schools as spaces for radical healing, we must be exceptionally intentional in the preparation of both ourselves and our environments.”

Embracing an Equitable Sliding Scale

Embracing an Equitable Sliding Scale

By Britt Hawthorne

Part 1: 3-minute read
If you identify as being poor, this is for you.

Part 2: 4 minute read

If you identity as someone committed to economic justice, this is for you.

“We invite each person to take inventory of their financial resources and look deeper at their levels of privilege or systemic barriers. This is a way to challenge the classist and capitalistic society we live in and work towards economic justice as a community. The goal is to create an organization where everyone is able to fully participate and the organizers are compensated fairly.

If it feels uncomfortable, it should. Our discomfort is required for justice.”

The Role of White Co-Conspirators in Dismantling Systemic Racism

The Role of White Co-Conspirators in Dismantling Systemic Racism

Written by Andrew Greenia
Edited by Daisy Han

12-min read

“If you have come here to help me, you are wasting your time. But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”

“Social justice work necessitates being in partnership with and yielding to the leadership of People of Color through solidarity, accountability, and dialogue. As I engage in racial justice work, I frequently encounter a dilemma where white people center whiteness by continually directing attention to their own experiences or minimizing the contributions of People of Color, even as we seek to decenter whiteness. By centering our own involvement and obscuring the voices of People of Color, white people often approach social justice work in ways that mirror the histories of colonialism and domination that anti-racist work seeks to subvert. Does this mean that white people do not have a role to play in dismantling systems of oppression? No. But, the ways in which we approach this work is critical.”

Embracing Equity is a Pathway for Healing

Embracing Equity is a Pathway for Healing

By Britt Hawthorne, Director of Communications

4-minute read

“The summer of 2016 was painful. I locked myself in our home and didn’t leave for two weeks. Struck with grief, anger, and fear, I started reading everything I could about equity, race, and structural racism to understand and dismantle white supremacy. Fast forward to 2017, I found myself leading conversations with social justice folxs, but I still hadn’t healed from the killings that happened in 2016: Keith Lamont Scott, Terence Crutcher, Philando Castile, Alton Sterling, and many more. The mainstream antidotes of bubble baths, chocolate, and Baptiste yoga didn’t seem to do the trick. My Western diet of self-care resulted in consumerism, saviorism, and my right to comfort. So, I continued doing what I knew, seeking more education.”